Surrounded by Creativity

I started the Georgia O’Keefe full-day workshop apprehensive, but I left inspired. Partly because I had a great art teacher, as well as keeping my mind open to learning. I also think a big part was due to being surrounded by like-minded people. This can be seen in the beautiful finished products by every single person in the class.

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To me, this reinforces the importance of surrounding myself with fellow artists, and being in an environment where we are all sharing (albeit quietly) the creative journey. This in itself helps to inspire, to fill the subconscious with creativity without even trying. All that needs to be done is to be present, and get creating.

I was nervous and tired at the start of the class. By the end I was energised and wanting to try another canvas using this technique. And when I look at the classes completed canvases I think it’s more to do with being in a shared space of creativity which has helped me feel uplifted and inspired.

As a writer, it’s important for me to remember this as I spend a lot of time creating alone as is the nature of being an author. It was insightful to be in an environment with other artists, sharing the same journey for a moment in time, and how this can positively, subtly influence my art as well as my well-being.

Have you ever experience starting a workshop apprehensive, but then finding quiet inspiration within the class by the end? Please share in the comments below.

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Bunny Art

As part of my general art class this term we had a lesson dedicated to a guest artist Cat Leonard who taught her unique approach. Once again, I felt like a fish out of water, plunged into the unknown and having to adapt and learn.

This is all part of being a student so it wasn’t like I was opposed to this lesson or process. I just have to ensure I keep an open mind, pay attention, and be ready to give it a go, and to adapt if it doesn’t go to plan, which of course is part of the artistic process.

At least now when I comes to drawing and painting I know how to mentally prepare for trying something new and going with the flow. But how else can I be self-aware or mindful of this unique process for myself?

I gave this new technique a go, while being able to accept my feelings of hesitation, and amazingly I produced a rabbit using a mix of mediums and techniques. Not what I was expecting.

Maybe my attitude of being open minded helped?

By not having any pre-conceived expectations, as well as an open mind and a willingness to ‘give it a go’ and being mindful, I’ve come away from the class with a painting of a bunny which I’m happy with.

In addition, I’ve not only learnt a new technique, but I’m inspired to try this again at home – by myself (I’m going to try a dragon!). This is a sign of how much I’ve grown with my artistic skill. It’s not so much going up a level, but how I feel.

Can I do this at home? Alone? Before I was too scared to try, but now I’m willing to. This is the real next step in my unique journey as an artist – stepping out and going it alone, prepared for any sort of outcome. And also by being mindful, I can continue to learn along the way, gaining insights to myself, my approach and how I relate to the art I produce.

Stay tuned for how I go!

Have you noticed this stage when you’re creating? Please share in the comments below.

Lilliana

Happy New Year!

It seems that every year is a big year with lots happening, the good, the bad and the ugly. As we say farewell to 2017, I’d like to take a chance to reflect on the year that was.

Three top things that shaped my 2017 are:

3) Beginning Café Pondering blog

2) Starting up a journaling group on Meetups, Inspirational Journaling

1) Teaching ESL students

Of course inspiring family and friends, but that goes without saying 😉

There are so many other things too that shaped my 2017. The little things that whispered softly and can be easily over looked. Like how I made friends with the lady I shared an office with at work. But it was more, we shared creative endeavours, and encouraged each other to write and be creative. There was the signing off on my research proposal for my PhD. A writing workshop over a weekend in Sydney with the HayHouse publishers. Becoming an Aunty again. Starting art classes, with Splashout Art. Publishing my poetry book Fading Farmer, which I had held completed for two years unable to release out into the world. Plus so many other events I can’t quite remember, the ones that were negative and ugly which I will keep from here, as I am looking to release those events to move on to the new year. Like some of the world events, the ones that rock you to the core, the ones that cause the tears to flow, the ones that leave imprints on your heart.

As I remember the ‘good’ and forget the ‘bad’ I turn my attention to 2018.

What am I looking forward to? Right now, there are so many new doors opening for me, some of which I don’t know yet, it is difficult to see ahead for what may come in the following months.

I’ve managed to narrowed the list to three main things I’m looking forward to:

3) Presenting writing workshops (to make sure I do this, I’ve scheduled a Travel Writing workshop early February!)

2) New writing endeavours, writing more ‘life writing’ works.

1) Continuing my research on my great grandma, for my PhD, and learning more about my heritage, as well as growing and extending myself as I study.

I’m also looking forward to meeting new people, sharing my experiences in real life and on blogs with people. Continue my art classes and developing my skills with oil paints. To write more poetry. To simply write and journal and find the flow in life that nurtures me as best I can.

Starting a new year can be daunting. I don’t have a day job to rely on. I’m looking. For now I’ll have more time to write. The horizon ahead is wide with the haziness of the unknown, the forecast continually changes and I am constantly reminded that I’m not in control. But by focussing what I’m looking forward to helps me to move past the fear of the unknown, and allows me to deal with not being in control, because at least I can adjust how I respond to the situations. And by being grateful for the year past, and particular events, and interactions is a positive way to say goodbye, and move on.

Please share what you are grateful for in 2017 below in the comments and what you are looking forward to in 2018.

May 2018 bless you,

Lilliana Rose heart clipart

www.lillianarose.com

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Late, late, late!

I’m a bit late this morning so not much time to write, so little I think getting my notebook and pen out is really a token effort!

But between sips of coffee I opened my notebook. For the precious few minutes available I planned part of a workshop I hope to present in the new year. Just goes to show sometimes all you need is a few minutes! And to give it a go instead of focussing on the lack of time available.

Tying Knots

When I was in primary school the fad was to make friendship bracelets. A quick lesson from a classmate, a selection of a few colours of embroidery thread I convinced mum I had to have (lucky my mum was a big supporter of craft activities), and I was set to make the bracelets. I taught myself new designs, the patterns formed in my head (there was no Internet to look up or YouTube videos to watch). Each night before bed I would make a new bracelet. I made a lot of them.

For the life of me I can’t remember how to make them. I do remember I enjoyed knotting the thin threads and making up my own designs. As an adult, I thought I’d try and connect back to this childhood joy. Right now, macramé is back in fashion, and I thought I’d make my own hanging pot.

I bought a DIY pack and followed the instructions. It was much more difficult than I thought it would be. I had to undo the knots and start again at least three times, and I made such an error I had to contact the lady I bought the kit from for some more rope.

What was going on? The mistakes I were making was unbelievably stupid and why wasn’t I picking it up like I had when I was ten?

Adult brain.

I was second guessing without realising. I wanted to get it perfect the first time. I just wanted to get it done, and I was fixated on the end result.

When I was about ten, I didn’t have any of these expectations. I simply gave it a go. It’s this approach I’d like to get back to, but it’s not easy. My adult brain too easily interferes. Also, my adult brain learns much slower than when I was ten, a child’s brain is like a sponge and simply soaks up new information, and my adult brain is overloaded.

Wanting to give macramé another go, I booked into a workshop. Sometimes it’s much easier to be shown, and have a teacher there to help you out when you are all knotted up. Plus, there are a few tips which can help out, and keep you from getting over tangled.

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During the workshop, I connected more with how I approached making the friendship bracelets when in primary school. Also, I found a meditative state when I knotted. Maybe it was because I had more confidence because I wasn’t second guessing myself. While knotting, I worked at my own pace and rhythm. I found a way to relax, to have fun, to play, and reconnect to my inner child, whose approach to learning is something I should apply more in my life. This is what I’ll be attempting to do when I make up the DIY macramé hanging plant kit I have sitting on my kitchen table. I might be tying knots, but I’ll be having fun.