New Recipes

I’m taking a break from writing so I can re-fill my creative well. With a little more time available I’ve turned to cooking. Cooking is a day to day chore, but does it have to be? How can I make this more interesting for me? Well I enjoy cooking for bubs so that helps. And I want to look after myself, so another helpful perspective to remember. I also like trying new recipes, bingo!

As I’m deciding on what recipe to try next, then how to change the recipe to suit my diet, and then the actual process of cooking, I realise this is another form of creativity, and it’s also helping to nurture me (and bubs) but also it nurtures my creativity too. So there’s lots of wins going on here.corn chowder

beef and vegetables
Beef and Veg for Bubs

By trying a new recipe I’m exploring the unknown, like I do when writing but I’m using different creative muscles. This means my writing muscles can have a break, and I work out a new set of muscles. And I’m still being creative, which is something I love to do.

While I’m expressing my creativity differently I feed my soul in a new way. This will then influence my writing when I get back to it, how I don’t know, but at least I’m setting myself up the best way I can. The only downside, is that I love baking cakes, which is not good for my waistline!

A simple but effective way to help with creative flow, at least for me. All from simply cooking, a day to day necessity.

Share below how cooking influences your creativity.

No Ink!

I can’t believe this happened! I’m usually so organised, especially when it comes to pens. And when writing with a fountain pen, there’s a little more to consider like having spare ink cartridges. There’s nothing more frustrating than running out of ink when writing, more so when I’m in the flow.

So I couldn’t believe it when I went to change my ink cartridge, to find that the spare was indeed used, empty! I can see the funny side to all of this. And as much as it pained me, I switched over and used another pen – not the look I like in my journal, but it really doesn’t matter. Now, I do have a fresh ink cartridge in my handbag, ready to go.

 

Lilliana

Joy After Art Class

Before art class I was feeling tired, low energy and not at all in the mood to leave my home and paint for a few hours. Creating was the last thing on my mind. All I wanted to do was curl up on my lounge under a blanket and watch mind numbing TV. I’d also like to note that I’d had a busy week so it wasn’t surprising I was tired.

Despite my tired mood, I picked myself off the lounge and went off to art class. I started a new painting, I learnt a new technique and I stepped into the unknown that’s always there when creating.

It was much better than spending the evening at home. And I was much happier. It certainly worked for me to create and lift my mood, and help me to reconnect with my joy.

Lilliana Rose

www.lillianarose.com

Happy New Year!

It seems that every year is a big year with lots happening, the good, the bad and the ugly. As we say farewell to 2017, I’d like to take a chance to reflect on the year that was.

Three top things that shaped my 2017 are:

3) Beginning Café Pondering blog

2) Starting up a journaling group on Meetups, Inspirational Journaling

1) Teaching ESL students

Of course inspiring family and friends, but that goes without saying 😉

There are so many other things too that shaped my 2017. The little things that whispered softly and can be easily over looked. Like how I made friends with the lady I shared an office with at work. But it was more, we shared creative endeavours, and encouraged each other to write and be creative. There was the signing off on my research proposal for my PhD. A writing workshop over a weekend in Sydney with the HayHouse publishers. Becoming an Aunty again. Starting art classes, with Splashout Art. Publishing my poetry book Fading Farmer, which I had held completed for two years unable to release out into the world. Plus so many other events I can’t quite remember, the ones that were negative and ugly which I will keep from here, as I am looking to release those events to move on to the new year. Like some of the world events, the ones that rock you to the core, the ones that cause the tears to flow, the ones that leave imprints on your heart.

As I remember the ‘good’ and forget the ‘bad’ I turn my attention to 2018.

What am I looking forward to? Right now, there are so many new doors opening for me, some of which I don’t know yet, it is difficult to see ahead for what may come in the following months.

I’ve managed to narrowed the list to three main things I’m looking forward to:

3) Presenting writing workshops (to make sure I do this, I’ve scheduled a Travel Writing workshop early February!)

2) New writing endeavours, writing more ‘life writing’ works.

1) Continuing my research on my great grandma, for my PhD, and learning more about my heritage, as well as growing and extending myself as I study.

I’m also looking forward to meeting new people, sharing my experiences in real life and on blogs with people. Continue my art classes and developing my skills with oil paints. To write more poetry. To simply write and journal and find the flow in life that nurtures me as best I can.

Starting a new year can be daunting. I don’t have a day job to rely on. I’m looking. For now I’ll have more time to write. The horizon ahead is wide with the haziness of the unknown, the forecast continually changes and I am constantly reminded that I’m not in control. But by focussing what I’m looking forward to helps me to move past the fear of the unknown, and allows me to deal with not being in control, because at least I can adjust how I respond to the situations. And by being grateful for the year past, and particular events, and interactions is a positive way to say goodbye, and move on.

Please share what you are grateful for in 2017 below in the comments and what you are looking forward to in 2018.

May 2018 bless you,

Lilliana Rose heart clipart

www.lillianarose.com

rose clipart

 

Where to Start?

Where to start a story may seem a stupid question to ask. Of course you need to start at the beginning when telling or writing a story. It’s important because this is when you hook your audience. The problem is, the beginning may not always be clear, or there could be multiple places where a story can start.

Writing isn’t like drawing or painting, where you can start at the top, middle or bottom of the canvas. On a canvas, you can see where you are going, and the space to be creatively filled is clearly defined. It doesn’t work like that with writing. With a story, there’s the start, middle and end, and you can begin at any of these points and write out of order. Sure, writers usually start writing at the top left hand side of a page, moving across to the right (when writing in English) then down to the next line and so on. But this top of the page could be in the middle of a story, or a new scene, or the start of a chapter. There are so many more choices when constructing a story, many which are hidden. The writer is working with the unknown, and may have an idea where to go, but there could be multiple ways to get there.

At some point, the only decision that can be made is to choose a point in the story and write. The structure will become clear the more that is written. Like all good travellers, the writer might get lost, have to back track and take another path. I’ve thrown away 30-40,000 words before in a story and re-written those words, and now I’m planning on doing a complete re-write of these 70,000 words. What a waste?! Not really. I needed to write in order to find the start and I was learning about my writing style that was best suited for this particular story (I have a different one for each story). It had to be done. This is going with the flow, my inner creative flow, and writing to see what takes shape. If the story ends up not going in a direction I feel is suitable for the story or characters, then I change. I may even abandon the story for a while to retrieve later, or use some parts in a different story.

That’s writing, a lot of hard work, persistence, trying new approaches, changing direction and not giving up. There can be times to persevere, but if it begins to feel like a block then I might jump ahead to another scene, or write another story, or take time to journal, or have a break. I never know what creative paths I’ll end up going down if I let go (just a little) and relax, trust myself that I’ll find a creative solution.

The more I write, the more I become aware of my journey, what is working, what isn’t and then I can adjust accordingly. Some loose suggestion of where to start will involve emotion, action, and a hook to draw in the reader. Once I’m writing, then I’ll begin to connect to the setting, characters, and emotion, then I will have a better idea of the direction the story is going in. At this point, I can reflect if this is the best place for the start, or if there’s somewhere else. The story can be re-structured when editing, but first there needs to be words on the page.

Finding the best start to a new story becomes a matter of jumping in, get writing, stop thinking of the outcome, and don’t question yourself. And that in itself is a very good place to begin a story.