Frog It!

I’m getting into my crocheting crafts as a way to relax, learn, and make things which have practical value for me and to have some fun. start stitch blanket

edges dont align

 

When doing craft it’s not all fun though. I’ve learnt that a new stitch, star stitch, wasn’t turning out like I’d hoped. Rows were decreasing, and I unravelled hours of work but still couldn’t manage to get the rows to line up.

I realised my skill set needed a project that was simpler. I had to do more practise and get experience before going back to the star stitch. Having to unravelled the stitches left me feeling heavy and disillusioned.

frog it

I did some searches online, watched a few YouTube videos and found what I thought was an easier project. A new project naturally called for different yarn and so a trip to the shops was in order.

With new yarn in hand and the recommended crochet hook I settled down to begin learning how to do the stitch, waffle weave. It was fine, I could do it. The problem was the yarn I’d chosen wasn’t right for the stitch and I needed a bigger hook.

waffle weave

 

This time, I wasn’t as disillusioned because I’d come across a new term.

I frogged it!

Rip it, rip it, rip it up!

frog it for waffle weave

Frog it sounds much better than undoing, or unravelling. It even makes me laugh when I’m undoing all my hours of hard work, which helps ease the frustration of having to start a project again or redo a section.

 

The language used makes a big difference. If I’m saying I’m unravelling or undoing, or deleting or unpicking depending on the creative project, then these terms have a heaviness to them, they weigh down my already deflated mood. Whereas frog it, because I’m saying ‘rip it’ over and over quickly sounds like a frog. This makes light of the situation and I don’t feel so frustrated at having to go back a few steps or start again from scratch. I can even have a giggle at the use of the term which lightens my mood and helps me to be motivated to get back into the project.

It didn’t stop there. With new yarn, I started again. But the hook wasn’t big enough, so once more I frogged it.

By going back with a bigger sized hook, and starting again I felt much happier with the forming blanket because I was creating a project to the best of my ability which helped to generate the feeling of satisfaction, progress, and achievement.

Creative projects, like any project can go off track, but with the use of some fun words it can be turned around. And creative projects largely have the purpose of not just of creative expression but also of undergoing a journey, giving a feeling of satisfaction, a chance to learn, exploration and provide a sense of achievement.

And are fun.

When the project doesn’t go to plan why not think of a frog, laugh and get back to it? It’s a more positive mindset that leads to more creativity and fun.

Was there a time when you’ve used positive, or fun words to help you go back and fix up a creative project? Please share below in the comments.

Lilliana

Stitch in Time

In the winter months I relax by watching TV by either knitting or crocheting. Doing something with my hands helps me to settle. Once I’ve eased into a rhythm, the counting of stitches moves from having to be thought about to a feeling, which happens naturally, and I slip into a meditative state. While my hands are knotting yarn into a scarf or beanie or cowl, the opposite is occurring in my mind – the thoughts are being untangled, events of the day are being unknotted and decisions processed with potential options considered and perhaps a resolution reached.

If I knit long enough my thoughts quieten, and the meditation deepens which is nurturing for my soul even if it only happens for a moment. My inner rhythm comes out in the pace I stich, making a physical connection to myself and how I feel. I can see if I’m stressed, the stiches are formed tightly. And so I can adjust, watching the stitches loosen as I knit. If they don’t loosen, then I know I still need to relax. So I take a few deep breaths, and try to release the thoughts or feelings that might be troubling me. This isn’t always easy, but as the stiches form, I have a visual of how I’m feeling, which becomes the focus towards relaxation, instead of the thoughts or feelings.

It’s also always rewarding to create. It’s a big part of my life, not just with my writing but also my craft. I feel it’s a different sort of creativity to when I’m writing, while I’m making something practical like a scarf (I keep it simple!) I’m seeing my progress and when I finish I can feel I have achieved a project, which is rewarding in itself. But its also a journey, not just physically making something but also an inner journey one that’s unfolding in secret as the length of the scarf increases. The scarf almost becomes a sign of how much I’ve meditated, my thoughts hidden in the stitches, captured in time and held outside of me where they can no longer trouble me.

While on the exterior, maybe it looks like I might be avoiding certain jobs, or putting off problem solving or planning, while I take time out to knit and crochet. The reverse is actually occurring. I’m allowing myself time to meditate. I’m mentally dealing with the problems, events, or planning at my own pace. What might look like procrastination, I’m really doing as the old saying goes “A stich in time saves nine.”