Guest Emma Liggins

Our guest today is Emma Liggins, who is an intuitive business coach and is going to discuss the impact of energy vampires on creativity. Thank you Emma!

Almost everyone has had a time in their life when they are working on a project and get stuck inside their own head and depending on the deadline or lack there of this can last for hours through to years. This is quite an easy thing to break free from but the problem is you are stuck inside your head and so it becomes overwhelming and impossible to identify the solution through the internal noise that’s going on.

I personally like to define a problem in order to be able to find or create a solution. Defining this problem is likely going to start with something you may never considered before, you see we call this one an energy vampire. 

An Energy vampire is a common term and is generally defined as a person, animal or object that drains energy from its prey. Think friend who is always complaining, narcissistic ex or sitting in Centrelink. We tend to only think of energy vampires as external but they can also be internal.

This is what we are going to talk about today.

The internal energy vampire that is the inner critic!

Now an inner critic can be a good thing and at times you may have found it really helpful, when it assists you with that final tweak or reins in your massive idea to something much more manageable at a certain point in your life. But unfortunately sometimes it is given free rein and it becomes overwhelming and all consuming.

Several years ago I had a client who was an aspiring writer. My client was an exceptional writer and a very talented individual but he was struggling to get words down onto paper. He would spend the day writing and get two and a half pages and then he would come back the next day and cull it back to one. This would have likely still worked ok if he could achieve the two and a half pages regularly. However there would be long periods of time where he would struggle putting down a sentence and then labouring over that until he was satisfied and then he’d move to the next and so on until he had a paragraph. Then he would go over that again removing what he considered not good enough until he was left again with only a sentence or perhaps even no sentence at all only a blank page staring back at him.

This was an inner critic that new no bounds and had effectively taken over my client’s whole creative process and pretty much annihilated it.

So we decided to evict the inner critic!

We used a visualisation technique to walk the critic to the door and politely, or not depending on your mood, ask them to stay outside for a period of time.

Next we created a new behavioural pattern.

Once outside a timer was set for two minutes and the client tasked with writing non-stop during that time. The topic could be anything and in the beginning the client wrote about their pen and then later their desk. And when they could not think what to write, in order to keep writing they wrote ‘I do not know what to write’ over and over.

After doing this exercise for some time the client was then able to apply this behavioural pattern to their writing. First evicting the critic, then setting the timer and finally writing. What they found was once they had started to write for their project it flowed. Even when the timer went off they were able to continue writing and time passed quickly while words filled the page.

By evicting the inner critic for an agreed period of time you can create a new pattern for yourself which can then be applied to your creative work.

Bio
Emma Liggins is a qualified Intuitive Business Coach with a Master of Adult Education, Certificate of Intuitive Wellness Coaching and is completing her last two subjects for a Graduate Diploma of Psychology.
 
Over the last 20 years, Emma has worked in a range of different settings including medical education (both primary and tertiary care), oil and gas (WHS), migrant resettlement and hospitality. Emma has also built two businesses from the ground up, one a massive failure and the other a national/international success. Combining her professional experience with her extensive travel, property development and living in urban and rural Australia and overseas, Emma has significant life experience to guide her clients towards achieving their personal and professional goals.
 
Emma is passionate about Occupational Wellness, supporting and guiding employees, startups and existing business owners to combat limiting beliefs and impostor syndrome through identifying personal genius and recognising challenges as great learning opportunities. Wherever you may be feeling stuck, Emma is able to uncover the endless possibilities available to you and support you in implementing practical achievable actions.

New Skill Level

I’ve always found it difficult to read crochet patterns. It’s as if they’re written in some old secret language. I’ve only been able to start new projects with the help of YouTube.

By starting a new project where I can only finish by reading the crochet pattern, I found I’ve actually got a feel for what the pattern means, and I’m actually able to progress and reach a new skill level. It surprised me really. I’ve tried to read crochet patterns for many years and it was a skill I’d given up on ever understanding. It’s harder than trying to learn a new language!

What it reflects to me is that I’m getting a feel of what’s required when crocheting. I’m slipping into that creative flow, to a deeper understanding to where I can begin to make confident decisions on the stitching and knotting to produce what I want to (and if not then I can see where I’ve gone wrong, frog it, and start again).

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It’s a new skill, a new level, and it’s exciting because this opens up so many more possibilities for me to try and explore in the crocheting world. I’m looking forward to it.

When have you unexpectedly found your skill levels improve? Please share below in the comments.

 

Inspiring Myself

Today, I’ve given myself a time out of life. I’m doing the minimal today. As part of relaxing, I sat down and watched the DVD of The Greatest Showman. I’d seen it on the big screen a few months ago, and loved it. This time around I enjoyed it just as much, and it was a good chance to continue with a crocheting project. The music, the costumes, the acting, the singing, the story, were fantastic. Then to continue the day of chilling I watch the ‘extras’.

I found myself inspired.The Greatest Showman.jpg

I found myself reaching for my phone so I could type down the thoughts that were flowing from the ideas that had suddenly come loose and floated to my consciousness, catching them in black words on my phone.

It was great. While I haven’t been in a drought, it’s been a while since I’ve enjoyed the simple flow of inspiration through me.

Often as a teacher, and mentor, even writer, I’m inspiring others. I love it. But I also need to be inspired myself. Sure, I have the things I do to stir up the creativity, and ideas, and get myself inspired – like walking along the beach, reading, painting, crafts, blogging, and going out with people. But this was the first time I was conscious that by watching a movie (while crocheting), and then watching the ‘extras’ and seeing other artists enthusiastic with what they were doing, my own creative well filled. I was overflowing with inspiration for the different creative projects I am planning.lettie and barmum.jpg

And I’ve been reminded that there are hidden benefits for me in watching a movie. Maybe it had a lot to do with the movie being The Greatest Showman, which was an amazing product of so many different artists coming together, and an inspiring story. I’m sure it was the determination in Lettie, in particular, which got my creative juices flowing.

I’ll be watching this movie again.

Are there any movies which have inspired you? What are the go to movies for you when you want to be inspired? Please share below.