Seascape

The fine line between not liking your work to being constructive about what you’ve created is important. Actually, it’s important in life as well.

I was reminded of this boundary between my perspective of negativity versus constructive thoughts in regard to a recent workshop on painting seascapes. Not only did I learn how to paint waves I also learnt the value of looking at my work, seeing how I feel about it, by asking myself some questions.

Do I like what I see? Is the painting working? No. What can I do about it? What can I change?

It’s the last two questions which I found particularly helpful. Because the answers gave me positive action to take. By asking these questions, it also prevented me from spiralling down into a puddle of negativity that what I’m doing isn’t good enough.

Why were these questions so valuable?

Not only did the answers help keep my mindset positive but also allowed me to pause and consider how I could improve the painting. The answers gave me a positive focus. And a chance to try something with the intention of progressing the painting.

Whatever I do may not improve the painting (to my liking) but I can keep repeating these questions until I do. Or worse case, if I’ve tinkered too much or overworked the painting, then this becomes a valuable lesson for me to have learnt, which I can apply to the next painting I do.

How did I apply this process to my seascape? The big wave in the centre wasn’t turning crashing over like it is now. It was rolling in a white top across the canvas. This looked a little boring. I wasn’t happy with it.

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With the help of the teacher the wave was changed part way across so that it was partly rolling over. It worked. It could’ve easily not have. And if that was the case, then I would’ve tried something else. Or learnt what not to do for the next seascape I painted.

 

Seascape Finished

It’s too easy to get down on your creative project, so it’s a good safety net as such to have process like asking yourself a few questions. “Am I happy with this? No. Then what can I do about it?” Because this can help generate inspiration and ensure the creativity keeps flowing.

New Skill Level

I’ve always found it difficult to read crochet patterns. It’s as if they’re written in some old secret language. I’ve only been able to start new projects with the help of YouTube.

By starting a new project where I can only finish by reading the crochet pattern, I found I’ve actually got a feel for what the pattern means, and I’m actually able to progress and reach a new skill level. It surprised me really. I’ve tried to read crochet patterns for many years and it was a skill I’d given up on ever understanding. It’s harder than trying to learn a new language!

What it reflects to me is that I’m getting a feel of what’s required when crocheting. I’m slipping into that creative flow, to a deeper understanding to where I can begin to make confident decisions on the stitching and knotting to produce what I want to (and if not then I can see where I’ve gone wrong, frog it, and start again).

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It’s a new skill, a new level, and it’s exciting because this opens up so many more possibilities for me to try and explore in the crocheting world. I’m looking forward to it.

When have you unexpectedly found your skill levels improve? Please share below in the comments.

 

Stuck

I’ve been stuck on these two rows for about a week! I found a mistake, so frogged it, re-did the rows, made another mistake, frogged it again. Caught up. Another mistake! Frogged it.

Now I’m taking a break.

It’s a basic stitch, so something else must be going on here. I’m rather busy right now, so tired when I sit to crochet. While I want to crochet I don’t have the headspace for it. Frustrating on one hand, but so is re-doing the same two rows.

Sometimes you just got to step away from the creative project, breathe, have a break, then get back into it.

I look forward to getting back to crocheting this blanket…next week sometime.

Not Writing Time

Coffee time at the Royal Adelaide Show.

No writing. Just coffee time.

Purely time to ponder, daydream, and to let my thoughts wander at will. Though maybe it’s writing in my head which makes a nice change to writing with pen and paper or typing on the computer. Considering some of my books are set at the Show, sitting and soaking up the environment is all part of filling the creative well.

My well is now full.

Inside/outside

I’m sitting on the inside/outside boundary of a cafe, on a sunny spring-is-almost-here day.

Perfect inspiration!

Plus I have a large coffee and a gorgeous journal.

Not Always About Words

My journaling isn’t always about words.

Sometimes it’s about playing with colour and ink.

It is always about creative fun though.

Here I’ve had fun with ink using different techniques. I’ve not been in control of the end product and I’ve taken a chance on letting the ink form naturally, or organically on the page.

It enhances my creativity, I’m having fun and therefore I’m relaxing. It also makes my journal beautiful. And if I wanted to, I could be inspired to write about them images formed out of a type of flow. By closing the journal, one image became two. Opposites, mirrors, reflections.

The quotes on the pages do mean that the pages aren’t entirely naked of words! It’s nice to have inspirational quotes on the  page, and be reminded of the creative journey others have been on.

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One Too Many?

Despite trying to limit myself to only having one crochet project on the go at once, and only starting a new project after I’ve finished a project.

I’ve broken this rule.

Shamelessly.

Not only have I begun a new crochet project without finished the first project, I have actually got three crochet projects on the go at once!

Three!!!

What can I say? I couldn’t help starting a new project, with a new stitch and pattern to learn. And to get to use new yarn.

The excitement of starting a new project called to me and I gave in. It’s a little addiction. It also keeps my mind active by learning new skills and trying a new pattern. I feel inspired which crosses over into other parts of my life.

I have a choice when I sit down to crochet on what project I work on, meaning I’m more in the creative flow rather than doing what I think I should do.

This is more relaxing and fun. A healthier way to approach my creative projects. The downside is that I can feel a little overwhelmed and a bit frustrated that I’m not finishing any projects. But, the positive side outweighs all of this. And that can only be a good thing.

Also, when completing creative projects it really is about the journey. The journey is personal. For me, my journey is about having more than one project on the go at once, this is my joy and when I’m thriving. So, I embrace it.

What is your approach like to your creative projects? Please share below in the comments.

Lilliana

Dragon Art

After completing the bunny art work, I was inspired to try the mixed medium techniques again. I love dragons, so I decided to challenge myself and try a dragon. I never thought I could do something as complicated as a dragon.

After doing a workshop, and being inspired to try what I’ve learnt at home is a very good outcome.

Because I enjoy documenting the creative process, I’ve included the stages from start, middle, and end of the creation of this piece. It was a somewhat sunny day, so I was enjoying painting outside.

Now, to find time to keep using this technique!

Starting…

Dragon Start

Progress…

Dragon progress

Nearly there…

Dragon nearly finished

 

Finished!

Dragon Final

 

 

Rainy Day

You can’t see the heavy rain in the photo but it is one of those winters days.

A perfect day to think at a cafe and write.

Importance of Tools

Often, I approach my creative projects with too much excitement and enthusiasm and simply jump in because I can’t wait to get started. Recently, while at the yarn shop I fell in love with some yellow yarn. I bought it home with a project in mind.

I didn’t get far into the project before I realised the yarn wasn’t right for the stitching I wanted to do. I’d not thought about that. I just figured all yarn would go with any type of stitch.

With enough projects on the go I returned the yarn, and bought some that would be better suited. I could’ve kept the yellow yarn, but really I have enough yarn in my house!

A small incident, but it reminded me of the importance of having the right tools for the project at hand. Sure I had yarn, the right sized hook, but not the right yarn for the stitch I wanted to learn. Not dissimilar to when I’m writing. I’m very particular about the pen I use, the notebook I have and where I sit and write. The tools used are important and while I know this, I hadn’t translated this across to my crocheting projects. I even know this when drawing and painting. I thought it would be simple.

Yarn + hook + stitch = pretty blanket.

But there was more to consider.

So now this is something I will think about when starting a new project. It was a good little lesson to learn or perhaps a good reminder to think of the importance of tools, and how they work together to produce a finished project.

Have you had a similar experience? Please share below in the comments below.

yellow yarn as a background